Halim Time and Glass Museum Profiled in The New York Times


 Halim Time and Glass Museum pic

Halim Time and Glass Museum
Image: nytimes.com

An avid collector of stained glass and timepieces outside of his career as a real estate investor, Cameel Halim unveiled his art collection to the public at the opening of the Halim Time and Glass Museum on September 26, 2017. Cameel Halim’s museum, which is located in Evanston, Illinois, has been profiled in New York Times articles in both 2016 and 2017.

The first article, published on July 7, 2016, focused on several of the stained-glass windows that were set to be displayed at the then yet-to-be-opened museum. The article specifically discussed the process of rescuing and restoring these windows, some of which were so dirty that they were completely obscured. Among the rescued pieces that now belong to the museum are those by John La Farge and George Washington Maher, as well as frequently overlooked designers such as Mary Tillinghast and Frederick Wilson.

In 2017, days after the museum opened, The New York Times published a second article. Titled A Collector’s Dream: Creating Your Own Museum as a Legacy, the article details the motivation for opening a private institution such as the Halim Time and Glass Museum. According to the newspaper, the inspiration for the Evanston museum was to provide a way to display a collection of art that took its founder three decades to develop. By sharing with the public the hundreds of pieces in this collection, Halim and the museum aim to provide a comprehensive overview of three centuries of timepieces and stained glass.


A Historic Kenilworth, Illinois, Home Saved at the Last Hour

Skiff Home pic

Skiff Home
Image: chicago.curbed.com

As head of CH Ventures, LLC, in Chicagoland, Cameel Halim has pursued numerous development projects that involved the value-driven restoration and rehabilitation of historic buildings. Cameel Halim was featured in a 2006 Chicago Sun-Times article that focused on his and his daughter Nefrette’s successful efforts to save the Skiff Home on 157 Kenilworth, in a storied northern suburb of Chicago.

The late 19th century prairie-style home was envisioned by Daniel Burnham, a well-known local architect who was director of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and creator of the Chicago Plan. Unfortunately, a wave of knock downs of historic Kenilworth homes was gaining momentum and the Skiff Home was undergoing a pre-demolition sell-off auction organized by a local developer. This involved the sale of moldings, doorknobs, and even staircase banisters.

The residence was saved at the last hour, as pressure from Citizens for Kenilworth caused the developer to reconsider her plans and agree to negotiate the sale of the Arts & Crafts home to Mr. Halim. The sale was a small victory, considering the larger issue in which Kenilworth civic leaders were unwilling to institute the landmark and historic district ordinances set in place by neighborhoods such as Lake Forest, claiming that they impinged on property owners’ rights.